Endometriosis is associated with progesterone resistance in the baboon (Papio anubis) oviduct: evidence based on the localization of oviductal glycoprotein 1 (OVGP1).

TitleEndometriosis is associated with progesterone resistance in the baboon (Papio anubis) oviduct: evidence based on the localization of oviductal glycoprotein 1 (OVGP1).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsWang, C, Mavrogianis, PA, Fazleabas, AT
JournalBiol Reprod
Volume80
Issue2
Pagination272-8
Date Published2009 Feb
ISSN0006-3363
KeywordsAnimals, Drug Resistance, Endometriosis, Endometrium, Estrogen Receptor alpha, Fallopian Tubes, Female, Glycoproteins, Papio anubis, Peritoneal Diseases, Progesterone, Receptors, Progesterone, Tissue Distribution
Abstract

Endometriosis has been associated with a reduced response to progesterone in both the eutopic and ectopic endometrium. In this study we evaluated OVGP1 and steroid receptor expression in oviducts of baboons with endometriosis during the midsecretory phase and determined whether progesterone resistance associated with endometriosis also occurs in the oviduct. Oviducts obtained during the window of uterine receptivity (Day 10 postovulation [PO]) from animals with induced and spontaneous disease were compared to control animals during the proliferative stage and in the implantation window as well as animals treated with the progesterone receptor (PGR) antagonist ZK 137.299 (ZK). OVGP1 was significantly higher in animals with endometriosis compared with Day 10 PO controls and was similar to that seen in the late proliferative phase and in ZK-treated animals. Baboons with spontaneous endometriosis also showed a similar persistence of OVGP1, which was correlated with the maintenance of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) in the epithelial cells of animals with endometriosis. However, epithelial cell height and the percentage of ciliation were not affected by endometriosis. These data imply that the normal antagonism of progesterone on ESR and OVGP1, which results in their downregulation during the window of implantation, is absent in animals with endometriosis. This was confirmed further when the action of PGR was antagonized in animals without disease, which also resulted in the persistence of ESR1 and OVGP1. These studies suggest that an aberrant oviductal environment may be an additive factor that contributes to endometriosis-associated infertility.

DOI10.1095/biolreprod.108.072496
Alternate JournalBiol. Reprod.
PubMed ID18923157
PubMed Central IDPMC2662730
Grant ListU54 HD040093 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 HD040093-07 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U54 HD 40093 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States