Germline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer.

TitleGermline rearrangements in families with strong family history of glioma and malignant melanoma, colon, and breast cancer.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsAndersson, U, Wibom, C, Cederquist, K, Aradottir, S, Borg, A, Armstrong, GN, Shete, S, Lau, CC, Bainbridge, MN, Claus, EB, Barnholtz-Sloan, J, Lai, R, Il'yasova, D, Houlston, RS, Schildkraut, J, Bernstein, JL, Olson, SH, Jenkins, RB, Lachance, DH, Wrensch, M, Davis, FG, Merrell, R, Johansen, C, Sadetzki, S, Bondy, ML, Melin, BS
Corporate Authors
JournalNeuro Oncol
Volume16
Issue10
Pagination1333-40
Date Published2014 Oct
ISSN1523-5866
KeywordsAdaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Adult, Brain Neoplasms, Breast Neoplasms, Checkpoint Kinase 2, Child, Preschool, Colonic Neoplasms, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p15, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Germ-Line Mutation, Glioma, Humans, Male, Melanoma, Middle Aged, MutS Homolog 2 Protein, Nuclear Proteins, Pedigree, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Although familial susceptibility to glioma is known, the genetic basis for this susceptibility remains unidentified in the majority of glioma-specific families. An alternative approach to identifying such genes is to examine cancer pedigrees, which include glioma as one of several cancer phenotypes, to determine whether common chromosomal modifications might account for the familial aggregation of glioma and other cancers.

METHODS: Germline rearrangements in 146 glioma families (from the Gliogene Consortium; http://www.gliogene.org/) were examined using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. These families all had at least 2 verified glioma cases and a third reported or verified glioma case in the same family or 2 glioma cases in the family with at least one family member affected with melanoma, colon, or breast cancer.The genomic areas covering TP53, CDKN2A, MLH1, and MSH2 were selected because these genes have been previously reported to be associated with cancer pedigrees known to include glioma.

RESULTS: We detected a single structural rearrangement, a deletion of exons 1-6 in MSH2, in the proband of one family with 3 cases with glioma and one relative with colon cancer.

CONCLUSIONS: Large deletions and duplications are rare events in familial glioma cases, even in families with a strong family history of cancers that may be involved in known cancer syndromes.

DOI10.1093/neuonc/nou052
Alternate JournalNeuro-oncology
PubMed ID24723567
PubMed Central IDPMC4165415
Grant ListR01CA126831 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA016672 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
5R01 CA119215 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
5P30CA16672 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA008748 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
5R01 CA070917 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P50 CA097257 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA015083 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
R01CA52689 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P50097257 / / PHS HHS / United States
R01 CA052689 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States