Global DNA methylation and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults: the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study.

TitleGlobal DNA methylation and risk of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults: the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsBressler, J, Shimmin, LC, Boerwinkle, E, Hixson, JE
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume219
Issue2
Pagination958-62
Date Published2011 Dec
ISSN1879-1484
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, African Americans, Age Factors, Aorta, Abdominal, Aorta, Thoracic, Aortic Diseases, Asymptomatic Diseases, Atherosclerosis, Autopsy, Case-Control Studies, Coronary Artery Disease, Coronary Vessels, DNA, DNA Methylation, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Liver, Logistic Models, Male, Matched-Pair Analysis, Odds Ratio, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Texas, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The association between hepatic global DNA methylation measured using pyrosequencing technology and the risk of subclinical atherosclerosis was examined in the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study. PDAY is a bi-racial investigation of the natural history of atherosclerosis and its risk factors involving 3013 individuals aged 15-34 years who underwent autopsy after dying of unrelated causes in 1987-1994.METHODS: Raised atherosclerotic lesions were defined as the sum of the percentages of intimal surface area detected in the right coronary artery and left half of the abdominal and thoracic aorta harboring fibrous plaques, complicated lesions, and calcified lesions during a postmortem pathological examination. To conduct the case-control study, 300 cases selected with the highest raised lesion scores were paired with 300 controls without raised lesions after matching for age, race, and gender.RESULTS: Global DNA methylation was not associated with disease risk in the study population considered as a whole using conditional logistic regression models to analyze matched pairs. Since the estimation of the risk of atherosclerosis associated with inter-individual variation in DNA methylation was similar if unconditional logistic regression was used, subgroup analyses were carried out after adjusting for matching variables. A modest association with methylation levels below the median value was found in white but not in African-American study participants (odds ratio = 1.59, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-2.49, p = 0.04).CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic global DNA methylation does not appear to be a definitive determinant of atherosclerosis burden in a postmortem sample of young adults.

DOI10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2011.09.040
Alternate JournalAtherosclerosis
PubMed ID22015179
PubMed Central IDPMC3272499
Grant ListR24 HL060808 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R24 HL060808-09 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL60808 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States