Relationship between low-density lipoprotein subclasses and asymptomatic atherosclerosis in subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitleRelationship between low-density lipoprotein subclasses and asymptomatic atherosclerosis in subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2004
AuthorsD Hallman, M, Brown, SA, Ballantyne, CM, A Sharrett, R, Boerwinkle, E
JournalBiomarkers
Volume9
Issue2
Pagination190-202
Date Published2004 Mar-Apr
ISSN1354-750X
KeywordsArteriosclerosis, Carotid Arteries, Case-Control Studies, Cholesterol, HDL, Continental Population Groups, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Lipoproteins, LDL, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Particle Size, Triglycerides, Tunica Intima
Abstract

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size has been associated with coronary heart disease, but an association between LDL size and preclinical atherosclerosis is less well established. Using gradient gel electrophoresis, large (A), intermediate (I) and small (B) LDL size subclasses were determined in 198 cases with asymptomatic carotid artery atherosclerosis (determined by B-mode ultrasonography) and 318 controls from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. In Caucasians, a smaller LDL size was more prevalent in men and associated with a higher body mass index, hypertension prevalence, and plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, but lower HDL-cholesterol. In African-Americans, a smaller LDL size was associated with higher triglycerides and lower HDL-cholesterol and hypertension prevalence. In Caucasians, Subclass B prevalence was 29.1% among cases and 14.8% among controls. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for Subclass B rather than Subclass A in Caucasian cases was 2.94 (1.67-5.17); the association remained significant after controlling for age, body mass index, smoking, and either plasma triglycerides or HDL-cholesterol. In African-Americans, however, there was no significant association between LDL subclass and case status. A predominance of smaller LDL particles is associated with asymptomatic carotid artery atherosclerosis in Caucasians, through mechanisms that remain to be elucidated.

DOI10.1080/13547500410001720758
Alternate JournalBiomarkers
PubMed ID15370875
Grant ListN01-HC-55015 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55016 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55018 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55019 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55020 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55021 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC-55022 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States