Serum prostate specific antigen changes in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) on a high sugar high fat diet.

TitleSerum prostate specific antigen changes in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) on a high sugar high fat diet.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsMubiru, JN, Garcia-Forey, M, Cavazos, N, Hemmat, P, Dick, EJ, Owston, MA, Bauer, CA, Shade, RE, Rogers, J
JournalProstate
Volume72
Issue5
Pagination469-75
Date Published2012 Apr
ISSN1097-0045
KeywordsAbsorptiometry, Photon, Animals, Blood Glucose, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Disease Models, Animal, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Macaca fascicularis, Male, Obesity, Organ Size, Prostate, Prostate-Specific Antigen
Abstract

BACKGROUND: An inverse relationship between serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels and body mass index (BMI) has been reported in men but not in any animal model.METHODS: Serum PSA in a colony of cynomolgus monkeys was assayed and correlated to body weight, prostate weight, and age. In addition, 15 animals were selected and fed a high sugar high fat (HSHF) diet for 49 weeks to increase their BMI and correlate it to PSA RESULTS: Serum PSA levels were positively correlated to prostate weight (r = 0.515, P = 0.025) and age (r = 0.548, P = 0.00072) but was not significantly correlated to body weight (r = -0.032, P = 0.419). For the animals on the HSHF diet, body weight, lean mass, fat mass, and BMI were significantly higher at 49 weeks than at baseline (P < 0.01). PSA was not significantly correlated to body weight and insulin at both baseline and 49 weeks. PSA was negatively correlated to BMI and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) at 49 weeks but not at baseline. In addition, we observed hepatic steatosis and increases in serum liver enzymes.CONCLUSIONS: Increases in BMI in cynomolgus monkeys as a result of consuming a HSHF diet resulted in PSA changes similar to those in humans with increased BMI. Cynomolgus monkeys are a useful model for investigating the relationship between obesity, diabetes, and PSA changes resulting from prostate gland pathology.

DOI10.1002/pros.21448
Alternate JournalProstate
PubMed ID21713965
PubMed Central IDPMC3184308
Grant ListK01 RR025161 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
K01 RR025161-02 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
K01 RR025161-03 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
K01RR025161-01 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
C06 RR013556 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
K01 OD010973 / OD / NIH HHS / United States
K01 RR025161-01A1 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P51 RR0139986 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P51 RR013986 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States