Two novel simian arteriviruses in captive and wild baboons (Papio spp.).

TitleTwo novel simian arteriviruses in captive and wild baboons (Papio spp.).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsBailey, AL, Lauck, M, Sibley, SD, Pecotte, J, Rice, K, Weny, G, Tumukunde, A, Hyeroba, D, Greene, J, Correll, M, Gleicher, M, Friedrich, TC, Jahrling, PB, Kuhn, JH, Goldberg, TL, Rogers, J, O'Connor, DH
JournalJ Virol
Volume88
Issue22
Pagination13231-9
Date Published2014 Nov
ISSN1098-5514
KeywordsAnimals, Animals, Wild, Animals, Zoo, Arteriviridae, Female, Genetic Variation, Male, Molecular Sequence Data, Monkey Diseases, Papio, Phylogeography, RNA Virus Infections, RNA, Viral, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Topography, Medical
Abstract

UNLABELLED: Since the 1960s, simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV; Nidovirales, Arteriviridae) has caused highly fatal outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive Asian macaque colonies. However, the source(s) of these outbreaks and the natural reservoir(s) of this virus remain obscure. Here we report the identification of two novel, highly divergent simian arteriviruses related to SHFV, Mikumi yellow baboon virus 1 (MYBV-1) and Southwest baboon virus 1 (SWBV-1), in wild and captive baboons, respectively, and demonstrate the recent transmission of SWBV-1 among captive baboons. These findings extend our knowledge of the genetic and geographic diversity of the simian arteriviruses, identify baboons as a natural host of these viruses, and provide further evidence that baboons may have played a role in previous outbreaks of simian hemorrhagic fever in macaques, as has long been suspected. This knowledge should aid in the prevention of disease outbreaks in captive macaques and supports the growing body of evidence that suggests that simian arterivirus infections are common in Old World monkeys of many different species throughout Africa.

IMPORTANCE: Historically, the emergence of primate viruses both in humans and in other primate species has caused devastating outbreaks of disease. One strategy for preventing the emergence of novel primate pathogens is to identify microbes with the potential for cross-species transmission in their natural state within reservoir species from which they might emerge. Here, we detail the discovery and characterization of two related simian members of the Arteriviridae family that have a history of disease emergence and host switching. Our results expand the phylogenetic and geographic range of the simian arteriviruses and define baboons as a natural host for these viruses. Our findings also identify a potential threat to captive macaque colonies by showing that simian arteriviruses are actively circulating in captive baboons.

DOI10.1128/JVI.02203-14
Alternate JournalJ. Virol.
PubMed ID25187550
PubMed Central IDPMC4249091
Grant ListR01 TW009237 / TW / FIC NIH HHS / United States
C06 RR020141 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
C06 RR015459 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
P51 RR000167 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
RR15459-01 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
T32 GM081061 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
RR020141-01 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI077376-01 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI077376 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
HHSN2722007000161 / AO / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
T32 GM008692 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
TW009237 / TW / FIC NIH HHS / United States
HHSN272200700016I / / PHS HHS / United States
P51 OD011133 / OD / NIH HHS / United States
T32 AI055397 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
T32GM081061 / GM / NIGMS NIH HHS / United States
P51 OD011106 / OD / NIH HHS / United States
R01 AI098420 / AI / NIAID NIH HHS / United States
P51 RR013986 / RR / NCRR NIH HHS / United States