Baboon Genome Project

Image: Olive baboon
Olive baboon. Image source: Stolz, Gary M. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

About the Project

Diversity Panel

Image: Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Guinea baboon

Guinea baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Hamadrayas baboon

Hamadrayas baboon

Image source: Wisconsin National Primate Research Center

 

Image: Kinda baboon

Kinda baboon

 

Image: Yellow baboon

Yellow baboon

The BCM-HGSC is sequencing and analyzing the genome of the baboon (genus Papio). A high quality draft sequence of the reference genome has been produced from an olive baboon (Papio anubis), using read data produced by the Sanger, 454 and Illumina platforms. 

In addition to the deep sequence coverage of the reference olive baboon, BCM-HGSC has generated whole genome coverage from additional olive baboons, as well as individuals representing hamadryas (P. hamadryas), Guinea (P. papio), yellow (P. cynocephalus), chacma (P. ursinus) and kinda (P. kindae) baboons. Comparative analyses of these data are in progress and will result in a description of genomic diversity within and among species of the genus Papio. Comparisons with the human and other nonhuman primate genomes are also in progress.

Baboons are important both as a well-studied and diverse evolutionary radiation of Old World monkeys, and as laboratory primates commonly used in biomedical research. Although closely related, the species within this genus differ in social behavior, ecology, body size and other fundamental characteristics. In the laboratory, baboons are used as models of several human diseases, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, epilepsy, infectious disease and various aspects of basic neurobiology.

The project is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Diversity Panel

  • Chacma baboon (P. ursinus)
  • Guinea baboon (P. papio)
  • Hamadrayas baboon (P. hamadrayas)
  • Kinda baboon (P. kindae)
  • Yellow baboon (P. cynocephalus)
  • Additional Olive baboons (P. anubis)

Genomic Resources

Related Publications

Ackermann RR, Schroeder L, Rogers J, Cheverud JM. Further evidence for phenotypic signatures of hybridization in descendant baboon populations. J Hum Evol. 2014 ;76:54-62.

Harper KN, Fyumagwa RD, Hoare R, Wambura PN, Coppenhaver DH, Sapolsky RM, et al. Treponema pallidum infection in the wild baboons of East Africa: distribution and genetic characterization of the strains responsible. PLoS One. 2012 ;7(12):e50882.

Phillips KA, Rogers J, Barrett EA, Glahn DC, Kochunov P. Genetic contributions to the midsagittal area of the corpus callosum. Twin Res Hum Genet. 2012 ;15(3):315-23.

Mubiru JN, Cavazos N, Hemmat P, Garcia-Forey M, Shade RE, Rogers J. Androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in males of six non-human primate species. J Med Primatol. 2012 ;41(1):67-70.

Vinson A, Curran JE, Johnson MP, Dyer TD, Moses EK, Blangero J, et al. Genetical genomics of Th1 and Th2 immune response in a baboon model of atherosclerosis risk factors. Atherosclerosis. 2011 ;217(2):387-94.

Jolly CJ, Burrell AS, Phillips-Conroy JE, Bergey C, Rogers J. Kinda baboons (Papio kindae) and grayfoot chacma baboons (P. ursinus griseipes) hybridize in the Kafue river valley, Zambia. Am J Primatol. 2011 ;73(3):291-303.

Szabó CA, Kochunov P, Knape KD, McCoy KJM, Leland MM, Lancaster JL, et al.. Cortical sulcal areas in baboons (Papio hamadryas spp.) with generalized interictal epileptic discharges on scalp EEG. Epilepsy Res. 2011 ;93(2-3):91-5.

D Miley D, Baumgartner MH, Cheverud JM, Roseman CC, Rogers J, McLeod DE, et al. Heritability of alveolar bone loss from periodontal disease in a baboon population: a pilot study. J Periodontol. 2011 ;82(4):575-80.

Roseman CC, Willmore KE, Rogers J, Hildebolt C, Sadler BE, Richtsmeier JT, et al. Genetic and environmental contributions to variation in baboon cranial morphology. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2010 ;143(1):1-12.