Baboon Genome Project

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Olive baboon. Image source: Stolz, Gary M. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

About the Project

Diversity Panel

Image: Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Guinea baboon

Guinea baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Hamadrayas baboon

Hamadrayas baboon

Image source: Wisconsin National Primate Research Center

 

Image: Kinda baboon

Kinda baboon

 

Image: Yellow baboon

Yellow baboon

The BCM-HGSC is sequencing and analyzing the genome of the baboon (genus Papio). A high quality draft sequence of the reference genome has been produced from an olive baboon (Papio anubis), using read data produced by the Sanger, 454 and Illumina platforms. 

In addition to the deep sequence coverage of the reference olive baboon, BCM-HGSC has generated whole genome coverage from additional olive baboons, as well as individuals representing hamadryas (P. hamadryas), Guinea (P. papio), yellow (P. cynocephalus), chacma (P. ursinus) and kinda (P. kindae) baboons. Comparative analyses of these data are in progress and will result in a description of genomic diversity within and among species of the genus Papio. Comparisons with the human and other nonhuman primate genomes are also in progress.

Baboons are important both as a well-studied and diverse evolutionary radiation of Old World monkeys, and as laboratory primates commonly used in biomedical research. Although closely related, the species within this genus differ in social behavior, ecology, body size and other fundamental characteristics. In the laboratory, baboons are used as models of several human diseases, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, epilepsy, infectious disease and various aspects of basic neurobiology.

The project is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Diversity Panel

  • Chacma baboon (P. ursinus)
  • Guinea baboon (P. papio)
  • Hamadrayas baboon (P. hamadrayas)
  • Kinda baboon (P. kindae)
  • Yellow baboon (P. cynocephalus)
  • Additional Olive baboons (P. anubis)

Genomic Resources

Related Publications

Willmore KE, Roseman CC, Rogers J, Richtsmeier JT, Cheverud JM. Genetic variation in baboon craniofacial sexual dimorphism. Evolution. 2009 ;63(3):799-806.

Schlabritz-Loutsevitch NE, Lopez-Alvarenga JC, Comuzzie AG, Miller MM, Ford SP, Li C, et al. The prolonged effect of repeated maternal glucocorticoid exposure on the maternal and fetal leptin/insulin-like growth factor axis in Papio species. Reprod Sci. 2009 ;16(3):308-19.

Sherwood RJ, Duren DL, Havill LM, Rogers J, Cox LA, Towne B, et al. A genomewide linkage scan for quantitative trait loci influencing the craniofacial complex in baboons (Papio hamadryas spp.). Genetics. 2008 ;180(1):619-28.

Mubiru JN, Hubbard GB, Dick EJ, Furman J, Troyer DA, Rogers J. Nonhuman primates as models for studies of prostate specific antigen and prostatic diseases. Prostate. 2008 ;68(14):1546-54.

Vinson A, Mahaney MC, Diego VP, Cox LA, Rogers J, VandeBerg JL, et al. Genotype-by-diet effects on co-variation in Lp-PLA2 activity and LDL-cholesterol concentration in baboons fed an atherogenic diet. J Lipid Res. 2008 ;49(6):1295-302.

Mubiru JN, Hubbard GB, Dick EJ, Butler SD, Valente AJ, Troyer DA, et al. A preliminary study of the baboon prostate pathophysiology. Prostate. 2007 ;67(13):1421-31.

Bertin A, Mahaney MC, Cox LA, Rogers J, VandeBerg JL, Brugnara C, et al. Quantitative trait loci for peripheral blood cell counts: a study in baboons. Mamm Genome. 2007 ;18(5):361-72.

Rogers J, Kochunov P, Lancaster J, Shelledy W, Glahn D, Blangero J, et al. Heritability of brain volume, surface area and shape: an MRI study in an extended pedigree of baboons. Hum Brain Mapp. 2007 ;28(6):576-83.