Baboon Genome Project

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Olive baboon. Image source: Stolz, Gary M. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

About the Project

Diversity Panel

Image: Chacma baboon

Chacma baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Guinea baboon

Guinea baboon

Image source: BBC

 

Image: Hamadrayas baboon

Hamadrayas baboon

Image source: Wisconsin National Primate Research Center

 

Image: Kinda baboon

Kinda baboon

 

Image: Yellow baboon

Yellow baboon

The BCM-HGSC is sequencing and analyzing the genome of the baboon (genus Papio). A high quality draft sequence of the reference genome has been produced from an olive baboon (Papio anubis), using read data produced by the Sanger, 454 and Illumina platforms. 

In addition to the deep sequence coverage of the reference olive baboon, BCM-HGSC has generated whole genome coverage from additional olive baboons, as well as individuals representing hamadryas (P. hamadryas), Guinea (P. papio), yellow (P. cynocephalus), chacma (P. ursinus) and kinda (P. kindae) baboons. Comparative analyses of these data are in progress and will result in a description of genomic diversity within and among species of the genus Papio. Comparisons with the human and other nonhuman primate genomes are also in progress.

Baboons are important both as a well-studied and diverse evolutionary radiation of Old World monkeys, and as laboratory primates commonly used in biomedical research. Although closely related, the species within this genus differ in social behavior, ecology, body size and other fundamental characteristics. In the laboratory, baboons are used as models of several human diseases, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, epilepsy, infectious disease and various aspects of basic neurobiology.

The project is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Diversity Panel

  • Chacma baboon (P. ursinus)
  • Guinea baboon (P. papio)
  • Hamadrayas baboon (P. hamadrayas)
  • Kinda baboon (P. kindae)
  • Yellow baboon (P. cynocephalus)
  • Additional Olive baboons (P. anubis)

Genomic Resources

Related Publications

Tsukayama P, Boolchandani M, Patel S, Pehrsson EC, Gibson MK, Chiou KL, et al. Characterization of Wild and Captive Baboon Gut Microbiota and Their Antibiotic Resistomes. mSystems. 2018 ;3(3).

Joganic JL, Willmore KE, Richtsmeier JT, Weiss KM, Mahaney MC, Rogers J, et al. Additive genetic variation in the craniofacial skeleton of baboons (genus Papio) and its relationship to body and cranial size. Am J Phys Anthropol. 2018 ;165(2):269-285.

Steely CJ, Walker JA, Jordan VE, Beckstrom TO, McDaniel CL, St Romain CP, et al. Alu Insertion Polymorphisms as Evidence for Population Structure in Baboons. Genome Biol Evol. 2017 ;9(9):2418-2427.

Buechler CR, Bailey AL, Lauck M, Heffron A, Johnson JC, Lawson CCampos, et al. Genome Sequence of a Novel Kunsagivirus (Picornaviridae: Kunsagivirus) from a Wild Baboon (Papio cynocephalus). Genome Announc. 2017 ;5(18).

Buechler CR, Bailey AL, Weiler AM, Barry GL, Breitbach ME, Stewart LM, et al. Seroprevalence of Zika Virus in Wild African Green Monkeys and Baboons. mSphere. 2017 ;2(2).

Bailey AL, Lauck M, Mohns M, Peterson EJ, Beheler K, Brunner KG, et al. Durable sequence stability and bone marrow tropism in a macaque model of human pegivirus infection. Sci Transl Med. 2015 ;7(305):305ra144.

Johnson Z, Brent L, Alvarenga JCarlos, Comuzzie AG, Shelledy W, Ramirez S, et al. Genetic influences on response to novel objects and dimensions of personality in Papio baboons. Behav Genet. 2015 ;45(2):215-27.

Bailey AL, Lauck M, Sibley SD, Pecotte J, Rice K, Weny G, et al. Two novel simian arteriviruses in captive and wild baboons (Papio spp.). J Virol. 2014 ;88(22):13231-9.